Article

Generalized site occupancy models allowing for false positive and false negative errors.

U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland 20708, USA.
Ecology (Impact Factor: 5). 05/2006; 87(4):835-41. DOI: 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[835:GSOMAF]2.0.CO;2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Site occupancy models have been developed that allow for imperfect species detection or "false negative" observations. Such models have become widely adopted in surveys of many taxa. The most fundamental assumption underlying these models is that "false positive" errors are not possible. That is, one cannot detect a species where it does not occur. However, such errors are possible in many sampling situations for a number of reasons, and even low false positive error rates can induce extreme bias in estimates of site occupancy when they are not accounted for. In this paper, we develop a model for site occupancy that allows for both false negative and false positive error rates. This model can be represented as a two-component finite mixture model and can be easily fitted using freely available software. We provide an analysis of avian survey data using the proposed model and present results of a brief simulation study evaluating the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator and the naive estimator in the presence of false positive errors.

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