Article

Trends in alcohol-related mortality in Sweden 1969-2002: an age-period-cohort analysis.

Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
Addiction (Impact Factor: 4.58). 07/2006; 101(6):835-40. DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01421.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To study the effects of age, period and cohorts on alcohol-related mortality trends in Sweden.
The study comprises an age-period-cohort analysis.
The analysis was based on all deaths in the Swedish population between 1969 and 2002.
Data on alcohol-related deaths in Sweden from 1969 to 2002 excluding accidental injury and homicide were used. The analysis covered 43 021 deaths.
Time period and birth cohort both influenced alcohol-related mortality. Male cohorts born in the 1930-40s exhibited the highest alcohol-related mortality, while for females those born in the 1940-50s had the highest alcohol-related mortality. For both men and women, those born in the 1960-70s had the lowest age-adjusted alcohol-related mortality. High-risk cohorts were young or in early adulthood during the periods that alcohol became more available in Sweden. The low-risk cohorts of the 1960-70s were brought up during a period when society was concerned with increasing alcohol problems and more emphasis was placed on issuing alcohol awareness information in schools.
Cohort effects were found suggesting that the link between alcohol consumption and non-accident alcohol-related mortality at the population level is dependent on other factors that may change over time. One such factor may be that restrictive alcohol policies have a greater effect on drinking in those who are younger at the time they are put into effect.

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