Article

New insights into the regulation of TLR signaling.

School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
Journal of Leukocyte Biology (Impact Factor: 4.3). 09/2006; 80(2):220-6. DOI: 10.1189/jlb.1105672
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is dictated by a number of factors including the ligand itself and the localization of the receptor, in terms of expression profile and subcellular localization and the signal transduction pathway that has been activated. Recent work into TLR signal transduction has revealed complex regulation at a number of different levels including regulation by phosphorylation, targeted degradation, and sequestration of signaling molecules. Here, we describe recent advances that have been made in our understanding of how TLR signaling is regulated at the biochemical level.

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