Article

The role of the basal ganglia in habit formation.

Laboratory for Integrative Neuroscience, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, 5625 Fishers Lane, TS-13, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
Nature reviews Neuroscience (Impact Factor: 31.38). 07/2006; 7(6):464-76. DOI: 10.1038/nrn1919
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Many organisms, especially humans, are characterized by their capacity for intentional, goal-directed actions. However, similar behaviours often proceed automatically, as habitual responses to antecedent stimuli. How are goal-directed actions transformed into habitual responses? Recent work combining modern behavioural assays and neurobiological analysis of the basal ganglia has begun to yield insights into the neural basis of habit formation.

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