Article

Myxoglobulosis of the appendix associated with a proximal carcinoid and a pseudodiverticulum.

Department of Pathology, Thermenklinikum, Moedling, Vienna, Austria.
Annals of Diagnostic Pathology (Impact Factor: 1.11). 07/2006; 10(3):166-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.anndiagpath.2005.09.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A 37-year-old woman presented with acute right lower abdominal pain. Intraoperatively, the appendix was enlarged and distended. The lumen of the appendix was tightly filled with pearl-like globules, diagnostic of myxoglobulosis, a rare variant of mucocele of the appendix. A carcinoid of 2.0 cm diameter was found in the proximal region of the appendix. The appendiceal mucosa showed hyperplastic-adenomatous changes. A pseudodiverticulum interpreted as evidence of increased intraluminal pressure was detected. The latter may be an adjunct to the proximal partial obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by the carcinoid in the development of the spheroids of myxoglobulosis.

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