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Total oxidant scavenging activity of Euterpe oleracea Mart. (Acai) seeds and identification of their polyphenolic compounds

Institute of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Department of Food Chemistry I, University of Bonn, Endenicher Allee 11-13, D-53115 Bonn, Germany.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (Impact Factor: 3.11). 07/2006; 54(12):4162-7. DOI: 10.1021/jf058169p
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The antioxidant capacity of methanol and ethanol seed extracts from Euterpe oleracea Mart. (açaí) against the reactive oxygen species (ROS) peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, and hydroxyl radicals was studied with the total oxidant scavenging capacity (TOSC) assay in a modified and automated version. Cold methanol digestion was the most efficient extraction method with respect to the antioxidant capacity. The extracts exhibit good antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals, similar to the capacity of the pulp. The antioxidant capacity against peroxynitrite and hydroxyl radicals is even higher. The main antioxidants identified by HPLC-MS and HPLC-CEAD are five different procyanidins (di- through pentamers); furthermore, protocatechuic acid and epicatechin were identified as minor compounds. Determination of TOSC values of HPLC seed extract fractions indicates that the procyanidins contribute substantially to the overall antioxidant capacity. In addition, however, other compounds that have not yet been identified are responsible for a large part of the observed antioxidant capacity.

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    • "Euterpe oleracea Mart., popularly known as “açaí,” is widely cultivated in the Amazon region of Brazil. Chemical studies have shown that this purple fruit contains hydroxybenzoic acids, antioxidant polyphenolics, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins, predominantly cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucuronide [8-10]. Açaí exhibits anti-inflammatory action through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 [11], vasodilator effect [12], inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and expression [13], and antioxidant properties in acute lung inflammation [14]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background This study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of Euterpe oleracea Mart., popularly known as “açaí”, on rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI). Methods Hydroalcoholic extracts of açaí were obtained from a decoction of the seeds. Two male Wistar rat groups were delineated: 1) the sham-operated group (control, n = 6), with no surgical amendment, and 2) the MI group (n = 12), in which the anterior descendent coronary artery was occluded during surgery. MI group was divided into two subgroups, in which rats were either treated with hydroalcoholic extract of Euterpe oleracea seeds (100 mg/kg/day p.o.) or received no treatment. Treatment began on the day of surgery, and lasted 4 weeks. Subsequently, rats were subject to an exercise test protocol, hemodynamic evaluation, and histological analysis of the left ventricle. Groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Dunnett’s test. Results The total running distance of sham rats was 1339.0 ± 276.6 m, MI rats was 177.6 ± 15.8 m (P < 0.05), and MI-açaí rats was 969.9 ± 362.2 m. Systolic arterial pressure was significantly decreased in MI rats (86.88 ± 4.62 mmHg) compared to sham rats (115.30 ± 7.24 mmHg; P < 0.05). Açaí treatment prevented a reduction in systolic arterial pressure (130.00 ± 8.16 mmHg) compared to MI rats (P < 0.05). Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure was significantly augmented in MI rats (17.62 ± 1.21 mmHg) compared to sham rats (4.15 ± 1.60 mmHg; P < 0.05), but was 3.69 ± 2.69 mmHg in açaí-treated rats (P < 0.05 vs. MI). The LV relaxation rate (-dp/dt) was reduced in MI rats compared to the sham group, whereas açaí treatment prevented this reduction. Açaí treatment prevented cardiac hypertrophy and LV fibrosis in MI rats. Conclusions Euterpe oleracea treatment of MI rats prevented the development of exercise intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 07/2014; 14(1):227. DOI:10.1186/1472-6882-14-227 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    • "[14] [15] [16] [17] Euterpe oleraceae (Acai), a large palm tree indigenous to the Amazon River, had been evaluated for phenolic constituents and their biological activity. [18] [19] [20] Due to the structural complexity of PAC derivatives and high difficulties in their separation, studies on these compounds are limited in comparison with other polyphenols. [21] [22] Usually, catechins give unresolved high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks, due to the similarity in their structures and also to the large number of phenolic groups that can give the same interactions with chromatographic stationary phase. "
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    ABSTRACT: Medemia argun is an ancient palm rich in proanthocyanidins (PACs). These polyphenolic compounds are widely distributed in plants and are an integral part of the human diet. A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) method in the negative ion mode for sequencing these ubiquitous and highly beneficial antioxidants is described in order to profile different PACs in M. argun nuts. The analytical protocol based on tandem mass spectrometry was used to sequence dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers with different A-type, B-type and A/B-type linkages. Diagnostic ions resulting from heterocyclic ring fission and retro-Diels-Alder reaction of flavan-3-ol provided information on the hydroxylation pattern and the type of interflavan bond. The sequences were discovered through ions derived from quinone methide cleavage of the interflavan bond. The identification of PACs linkages through LC-MS(n) eliminates a number of tedious separation steps. The method was successfully applied to give a view of PAC profile in M. argun nuts. M. argun nuts contained 636.88 mg/g PACs (as equivalent of (þ)-catechin). The data obtained in our research show that M. argun is a rich source of hydrolyzable PACs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Mass Spectrometry 04/2014; 49(4):306-15. DOI:10.1002/jms.3344 · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    • "[14] [15] [16] [17] Euterpe oleraceae (Acai), a large palm tree indigenous to the Amazon River, had been evaluated for phenolic constituents and their biological activity. [18] [19] [20] Due to the structural complexity of PAC derivatives and high difficulties in their separation, studies on these compounds are limited in comparison with other polyphenols. [21] [22] Usually, catechins give unresolved high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks, due to the similarity in their structures and also to the large number of phenolic groups that can give the same interactions with chromatographic stationary phase. "
    Journal of Mass Spectrometry 01/2014; · 2.71 Impact Factor
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