Article

Plasmid pWW115, a cloning vector for use with Moraxella catarrhalis.

Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-9048, USA.
Plasmid (Impact Factor: 1.76). 10/2006; 56(2):133-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.plasmid.2006.03.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The plasmid shuttle vector pWW102B is able to replicate in only a modest number of Moraxella catarrhalis strains. Plasmid pWW115, a spontaneous deletion mutant of pWW102B, was shown to lack both the pACYC184-derived origin of replication and the associated chloramphenicol-resistance gene but was able to replicate in every M. catarrhalis strain tested in this study, including one strain that had been previously refractory to all types of genetic manipulations. To test the utility of this plasmid, a M. catarrhalis gene encoding the UspA2 serum-resistance factor was cloned into pWW115 and the resultant recombinant plasmid was shown to confer serum-resistance on a serum-sensitive M. catarrhalis uspA2 mutant.

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