Article

Are you currently on a diet? What respondents mean when they say "yes".

Center for Counseling and Student Development, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA.
Eating Disorders 05/2006; 14(2):157-66. DOI: 10.1080/10640260500536300
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Male and female university students were asked the questions "Are you currently on a diet to lose weight?" and "Are you currently on a diet to maintain your weight?" Respondents were asked to clarify positive responses by listing weight-control behaviors in which they were engaged. Responses were coded into 12 categories of dieting methods. Results indicated women and men who diet to lose weight engage in a wider variety of weight-loss behaviors than those engaged in dieting to maintain weight. Findings further indicated differences in dieting methods between individuals dieting to lose weight as opposed to dieting to maintain weight.

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