Article

Factors associated with quitting smoking at a tobacco dependence treatment clinic.

Tobacco Dependence Program (TDP), University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Public Health (SPH), New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA.
American journal of health behavior (Impact Factor: 1.31). 07/2006; 30(4):400-12. DOI: 10.5555/ajhb.2006.30.4.400
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To identify factors associated with successful quitting at a free tobacco treatment clinic.
A cohort study of the first 1021 patients who made a quit attempt. Baseline and treatment variables were recorded, and logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with abstinence at 4-week and 6-month follow-up.
Three hundred twenty (31.3%) patients reported tobacco abstinence at 6 months. Several markers of low socioeconomic status and high nicotine dependence were predictive of poorer smoking cessation outcomes. Compliance with evidence-based treatment was associated with improved treatment outcome, as was older age and having more than 2 children.
Efforts should be made to enhance treatment compliance among smokers with indicators of high nicotine dependence and low socioeconomic status.

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