Article

Delayed sample processing leads to marked decreases in measured plasma IL-7 levels

NCI-Frederick, Фредерик, Maryland, United States
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (Impact Factor: 4.39). 09/2006; 42(4):511-2. DOI: 10.1097/01.qai.0000225741.16840.ac
Source: PubMed
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