Article

Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of ethyl-eicosapentanoate in the treatment of bipolar depression and rapid cycling bipolar disorder.

Psychopharmacology Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Mental Health Care Line, Cincinnati, Ohio 45267-0559, USA.
Biological Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 9.47). 12/2006; 60(9):1020-2. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.03.056
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The results of pilot trials suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may have efficacy in the treatment of mood symptoms in bipolar disorder.
We conducted a 4-month, randomized, placebo-controlled, adjunctive trial of ethyl-eicosapentanoate (EPA) 6 g/day in the treatment of bipolar depression and rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Subjects were receiving mood-stabilizing medications at therapeutic doses or plasma concentrations. The measures of efficacy were early study discontinuation, changes from baseline in depressive symptoms (Inventory for Depressive Symptomology total score) and in manic symptoms (Young Mania Rating Scale total score), and manic exacerbations ("switches"). We also measured side effects and bleeding time, a biomarker of drug action.
Overall, there were no significant differences on any outcome measure between the EPA and placebo groups.
This study did not find overall evidence of efficacy for adjunctive treatment with EPA 6 g/day in outpatients with bipolar depression or rapid cycling bipolar disorder.

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