Article

16S rRNA phylogenetic investigation of the candidate division "Korarchaeota".

Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology (Impact Factor: 3.68). 08/2006; 72(7):5077-82. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.00052-06
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The environmental distribution and phylogeny of "Korarchaeota," a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9 degrees N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity.

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