Article

Potassium containing toothpastes for dentine hypersensitivity

University of Aarhus, Department of Community Oral Health and Pediatric Dentistry, 9 Vennelyst Boulevard, Aarhus C, Denmark DK-8000.
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) (Impact Factor: 5.94). 02/2006; DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001476.pub2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Dentine hypersensitivity may be defined as the pain arising from exposed dentine, typically in response to external stimuli, and which cannot be explained by any other form of dental disease. Many treatment regimens have been recommended over the years, and in recent years particular attention has been focused on toothpastes containing various potassium salts.
To compare the effectiveness of potassium containing toothpastes with control toothpastes in reducing dentine hypersensitivity.
The following databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (searched until August 2005); CENTRAL (until August 2005); EMBASE/MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science (until September 2005). Bibliographies of clinical studies and reviews identified in the electronic search were checked for studies published outside the electronically searched journals.
Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which the effect on dentine hypersensitivity of potassium containing toothpastes was tested against non-potassium containing control toothpastes.
Two of the review authors independently recorded the results of the included trials using a specially designed form. Sensitivity was assessed by using thermal, tactile, air blast, and subjective methods.
Six studies were included in the meta-analysis which showed the statistically significant effect of potassium nitrate toothpaste on air blast and tactile sensitivity at the 6 to 8 weeks follow up, e.g. the meta-analysis of air blast sensitivity showed a standardized mean difference in sensitivity score of -1.25 (95% CI: -1.65 to -0.851) in favour of treatment. The subjective assessment failed to show a significant effect at the 6 to 8 week assessment.
The evidence generated by this review is based on a small number of individuals. Furthermore, the effect varies with the methods applied for assessing the sensitivity. Thus no clear evidence is available for the support of potassium containing toothpastes for dentine hypersensitivity.

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