Article

Ectopic thyroid in an adrenal mass: a case report

Department of Urology, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.
BMC Urology (Impact Factor: 1.94). 02/2006; 6:18. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2490-6-18
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT It is difficult to explain ectopic thyroid beneath the diaphragm because during the development the thyroid descends from the tongue to the anterior of the trachea. A few cases of ectopic lesions have been reported in the literature for abdominal organs including the adrenal glands, but the mechanism by which the thyroid components migrate into the abdomen has been poorly understood.
A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed as having an adrenal mass. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was carried out. Microscopically, the mass was composed of normal adrenal and ectopic thyroid tissues.
We herein describe the fourth case reported of ectopic thyroid in the adrenal gland.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Jun Hagiuda, Jul 07, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
106 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ectopic thyroid tissue is a rare abnormality that mainly occurs in the midline of the neck but also in other unusual locations. Because fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a widely used procedure for evaluating head and neck and other palpable masses, sampling of these lesions may be encountered. A 66-year-old woman presented with left lateral chest wall mass during follow-up for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Initial evaluation by FNAB suggested ectopic thyroid tissue, which was confirmed later by tissue biopsy and immunostains. This is the first reported case of ectopic thyroid tissue in the lateral chest wall area. Awareness of this abnormality and the possibility of ectopic thyroid tissue in erratic locations will help cytopathologists make the correct interpretation on FNAB sampling.
    Acta cytologica 01/2009; 53(3):313-5. · 1.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Ectopic thyroid tissue is a rare abnormality that mainly occurs in the midline of the neck but also in other unusual locations. Because fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a widely used procedure for evaluating bead and neck and other palpable masses, sampling of these lesions may be encountered. Case A 66-year-old woman presented with left lateral chest wall mass during follow-up fir chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Initial evaluation by FNAB si suggested ectopic thyroid tissue, which was confirmed later by tissue biopsy and immunostains. This is the first reported case of ectopic thyroid tissue in the lateral chest wall area. Conclusion Awareness of this abnormality and the possibility of ectopic thyroid tissue in erratic locations will help cytopathologists make the correct interpretation m FNAB sampling. (Acta Cytol 2009;53:313-315)
    05/2009; 53(3):313-315. DOI:10.1159/000325315
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To describe a patient who, 5 years after total thyroidectomy to treat Graves disease, presented with thyrotoxicosis due to nonmalignant lateral ectopic thyroid tissue. We describe the laboratory, imaging, and physical findings of the study patient and review the relevant literature. A 32-year-old white woman with a history of Graves disease presented with recurrent hyperthyroidism 5 years after total thyroidectomy. A radioactive iodine scan was performed, which revealed elevated uptake (40%) and positive imaging in the left mid-neck. Ultrasonography examination of the neck confirmed the absence of any thyroid tissue within the thyroid bed, but documented 2 nodular, hypoechoic left upper-neck masses with punctuate hyperlucency. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed to precisely localize the nodules, which were excised surgically via selective neck dissection. Histopathologic examination revealed chronic lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate with focal thyroid hyperplasia and papillary infoldings and no evidence of malignancy. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of ectopic benign thyroid tissue as the sole cause of hyperthyroid symptoms, and this entity should be considered in patients who have undergone thyroidectomy and have persistent hyperthyroidism.
    Endocrine Practice 01/2010; 17(1):70-3. DOI:10.4158/EP10071.CR · 2.59 Impact Factor