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G-protein-coupled receptors: evolving views on physiological signalling: symposium on G-protein-coupled receptors: evolving concepts and new techniques.

Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 23rd Avenue South @ Pierce, Room 442 Robinson Research Building, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6600, USA.
EMBO Reports (Impact Factor: 7.86). 10/2006; 7(9):866-9. DOI: 10.1038/sj.embor.7400788
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