Comment on: Knol MJ, Twisk JWR, Beekman ATF, Heine RJ, Snoek FJ, Pouwer F. (2006) Depression as a risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A meta-analysis. Diabetologia; 49: 837–845

Diabetologia (Impact Factor: 6.67). 12/2006; 49(11):2797-8; author reply 2799-800. DOI: 10.1007/s00125-006-0389-y
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