Article

The history of tissue engineering.

Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.7). 09/2006; 10(3):569-76. DOI: 10.2755/jcmm010.003.20
Source: PubMed
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