Article

Assigning solid-state NMR spectra of aligned proteins using isotropic chemical shifts.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, 0307 La Jolla, CA 92093-0307, USA.
Journal of Magnetic Resonance (Impact Factor: 2.3). 01/2007; 183(2):329-32. DOI: 10.1016/j.jmr.2006.08.016
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A method for assigning solid-state NMR spectra of membrane proteins aligned in phospholipid bicelles that makes use of isotropic chemical shift frequencies and assignments is demonstrated. The resonance assignments are based on comparisons of 15N chemical shift differences in spectra obtained from samples with their bilayer normals aligned perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the applied magnetic field.

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Anna De Angelis