Article

Postural control, gait, and dopamine functions in parkinsonian movement disorders.

Department of Radiology and Neurology, University of Michigan, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Box 362, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA.
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.19). 12/2006; 22(4):797-812, vi. DOI: 10.1016/j.cger.2006.06.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Balance impairments and falls, which are common in patients who have parkinsonian movement disorders, are a serious threat to the health of these individuals. However, the underlying mechanisms cannot be fully explained by presynaptic dopaminergic denervation, because balance impairment is at least responsive to L-dopa therapy. This article reviews the latest clinically relevant literature relating postural control, gait, and dopamine in patients who have parkinsonian movement disorders.

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