Article

RalB Signaling: A Bridge between Inflammation and Cancer

University of Milan, Milano, Lombardy, Italy
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 11/2006; 127(1):42-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2006.09.019
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Studies in many different areas of cancer research including epidemiological studies have established the connection between inflammation and cancer (Balkwill et al., 2005, Balkwill and Mantovani, 2001 and Coussens and Werb, 2002). For example, inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer. Moreover, the usage of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents is associated with protection against various tumors, and these drugs have been investigated as possible anticancer agents. Even tumors where a firm connection to inflammation has not been established, such as breast cancer, exhibit an inflammatory microenvironment at the site of the tumor. Indeed, an inflammatory component is present in the microenvironment of most neoplastic tissues. In this context, Chien et al. (2006) now identify a signaling pathway mediated by the RalB GTPase that regulates both tumor survival and the inflammatory response.

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