Article

The genetics of autistic disorders and its clinical relevance: a review of the literature

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.
Molecular Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 15.15). 02/2007; 12(1):2-22. DOI: 10.1038/sj.mp.4001896
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Twin and family studies in autistic disorders (AD) have elucidated a high heritability of the narrow and broad phenotype of AD. In this review on the genetics of AD, we will initially delineate the phenotype of AD and discuss aspects of differential diagnosis, which are particularly relevant with regard to the genetics of autism. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies will be presented in detail, and the possibly involved aetiopathological pathways will be described. Implications of the different genetic findings for genetic counselling will be mentioned.

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Available from: Christine M. Freitag, Sep 24, 2014
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