Antiperspirant use as a risk factor for breast cancer in Iraq

Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, AI-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq.
Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de santé de la Méditerranée orientale = al-Majallah al-ṣiḥḥīyah li-sharq al-mutawassiṭ 01/2006; 12(3-4):478-82.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Some internet communications have addressed the link between antiperspirant use and breast cancer. We studied the possible association between the use of antiperspirants and some other factors with the development of breast cancer in Al-Kadhmia teaching hospital. Thus, 54 cases of breast cancer and 50 controls were interviewed. We found 82.0% of the controls used antiperspirants compared with 51.8% of cases (P< 0.05). The use of antiperspirants had no association with the risk of breast cancer, while family history and oral contraceptives use were found to be associated.

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Available from: Namir G Al-Tawil, Sep 27, 2015
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    • "This is especially true for breast tissues which contain a high content of fat, which makes sample preparation difficult. Early studies used indirect measurements of the aluminum content of breast tissues, for example questionnaires addressing the use of antiperspirants containing aluminum [16,17]. More recent studies have used better performing direct measurement techniques [18,19]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next logical step is the assessment of whether the aluminum concentration is related to the key genomic abnormalities associated with breast carcinogenesis.
    BMC Cancer 03/2013; 13(1):104. DOI:10.1186/1471-2407-13-104 · 3.36 Impact Factor
  • Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 01/2013; 24(1):172. DOI:10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182781684 · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This review examines recent evidence linking exposure to aluminium with the aetiology of breast cancer. The human population is exposed to aluminium throughout daily life including through diet, application of antiperspirants, use of antacids and vaccination. Aluminium has now been measured in a range of human breast structures at higher levels than in blood serum and experimental evidence suggests that the tissue concentrations measured have the potential to adversely influence breast epithelial cells including generation of genomic instability, induction of anchorage-independent proliferation and interference in oestrogen action. The presence of aluminium in the human breast may also alter the breast microenvironment causing disruption to iron metabolism, oxidative damage to cellular components, inflammatory responses and alterations to the motility of cells. The main research need is now to investigate whether the concentrations of aluminium measured in the human breast can lead in vivo to any of the effects observed in cells in vitro and this would be aided by the identification of biomarkers specific for aluminium action.
    Journal of inorganic biochemistry 07/2013; 128. DOI:10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2013.07.005 · 3.44 Impact Factor
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