Article

Comparability of self-collected vaginal swabs and physician-collected cervical swabs for detection of human papillomavirus infections in Rakai, Uganda.

Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 20852, USA.
Sex Transm Dis (Impact Factor: 2.75). 07/2007; 34(7):429-36. DOI: 10.1097/01.olq.0000243623.67673.22
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to compare human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing between self-administered vaginal swabs and physician-administered cervical swabs in women from rural Rakai District, Uganda.
Between 2002 and 2003, women from a population-based cohort participated in an HPV study. Women collected self-administered vaginal swabs and were also offered a pelvic examination, which included physician-collected cervical samples.
Hybrid-capture 2 was used to determine carcinogenic HPV status. Polymerase chain reaction was used to determine HPV genotypes. Unweighted kappa statistics were used to determine agreement.
Compliance with self-collected swabs was > or =86%; however, only 51% accepted a pelvic examination. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence was 19% in self-collected and 19% in physician-collected samples. Agreement among paired observations was 92% with a kappa of 0.75. Kappa between self- and physician-collected samples was similar in HIV strata (k = 0.71 and 0.75 for HIV-positive and HIV-negative, respectively).
In this community-based setting, detection of carcinogenic HPV was comparable among self- and physician-administered samples. Self-collection is a feasible and accurate means of obtaining HPV samples from women in resource-poor settings or persons reluctant to undergo a pelvic examination.

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