Article

A systematic RNA interference screen reveals a cell migration gene network in C. elegans.

Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1014, USA.
Journal of Cell Science (Impact Factor: 5.88). 01/2007; 119(Pt 23):4811-8. DOI: 10.1242/jcs.03274
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cell migration is essential during embryonic development and tissue morphogenesis. During gonadogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, migration of the distal tip cells forms two U-shaped gonad arms. Malformation results if the distal tip cells stop prematurely or follow an aberrant path, and abnormalities are easily visualized in living nematodes. Here we describe the first comprehensive in vivo RNA interference screen for genes required for cell migration. In this non-biased screen, we systematically analyzed 16,758 RNA-interference depletion experiments by light microscopy and identified 99 genes required for distal tip cell migration. Genetic and physical interaction data connect 59 of these genes to form a cell migration gene network that defines distal tip cell migration in vivo.

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