Article

Mathematical modeling and simulation of drug release from microspheres: Implications to drug delivery systems.

Molecular Engineering of Biological and Chemical Systems Program, Singapore-MIT Alliance, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576, Singapore.
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews (Impact Factor: 12.71). 12/2006; 58(12-13):1274-325. DOI: 10.1016/j.addr.2006.09.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of existing mathematical models and simulations of drug release from polymeric microspheres and of drug transport in adjacent tissues. In drug delivery systems, mathematical modeling plays an important role in elucidating the important drug release mechanisms, thus facilitating the development of new pharmaceutical products by a systematic, rather than trial-and-error, approach. The mathematical models correspond to the known release mechanisms, which are classified as diffusion-, swelling-, and erosion-controlled systems. Various practical applications of these models which explain experimental data are illustrated. The effect of gamma-irradiation sterilization on drug release mechanism from erosion-controlled systems will be discussed. The application of existing models to nanoscale drug delivery systems specifically for hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules is evaluated. The current development of drug transport modeling in tissues utilizing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will also be described.

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