Article

Further development of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised.

School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-2026, USA.
Journal of Obstetric Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing (Impact Factor: 1.2). 11/2006; 35(6):735-45. DOI: 10.1111/j.1552-6909.2006.00094.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To describe the newly developed item coding and computation of the total score for the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised along with recommended cutoff points.
Methodologic research.
Obstetrician and gynecologist offices in the Pacific Northwest.
This longitudinal study included 139 women; the study began in the participant's third trimester of pregnancy and ended at 8 months after childbirth.
The participants completed the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised in their third trimester of pregnancy and again at 2 and 6 months after childbirth. Postpartum depression symptoms were measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and psychiatric nurse practitioner interview at 2 and 6 months after childbirth.
Sensitivity and specificity of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised at three points: prenatal and 2 and 6 months after childbirth.
The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the Prenatal Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised performed well and explained 67% of the variance of postpartum depressive symptomatology as measured by Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale scores. The Prenatal Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised yielded a sensitivity of .76 and a specificity of .54 at a cutoff score of 10.5.
A cutoff score of 10.5 is recommended when using the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised during pregnancy. Further research needs to be conducted on recommended cutoff scores for use of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised during the postpartum period.

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