Article

Hemozoin Biocrystallization in Plasmodium falciparum and the antimalarial activity of crystallization inhibitors

School of Biochemistry, Genetics, Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P.O. Box XO1, Scottsville, 3209, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.
Parasitology Research (Impact Factor: 2.33). 04/2007; 100(4):671-6. DOI: 10.1007/s00436-006-0313-x
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Available from: Ernst Hempelmann, Jul 05, 2015
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