Article

The role of WRN in DNA repair is affected by post-translational modifications.

Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, National Institute on Aging, NIH, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development (Impact Factor: 3.26). 02/2007; 128(1):50-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.mad.2006.11.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive progeroid disease characterized by genomic instability. WRN gene encodes one of the RecQ helicase family proteins, WRN, which has ATPase, helicase, exonuclease and single stranded DNA annealing activities. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that WRN contributes to the maintenance of genomic integrity through its involvement in DNA repair, replication and recombination. The role of WRN in these pathways can be modulated by its post-translational modifications in response to DNA damage. Here, we review the functional consequences of post-translational modifications on WRN as well as specific DNA repair pathways where WRN is involved and discuss how these modifications affect DNA repair pathways.

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