Article

Functional and quantitative proteomics using SILAC.

Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany.
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology (Impact Factor: 36.46). 01/2007; 7(12):952-8. DOI: 10.1038/nrm2067
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Researchers in many biological areas now routinely characterize proteins by mass spectrometry. Among the many formats for quantitative proteomics, stable-isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a simple and powerful one. SILAC removes false positives in protein-interaction studies, reveals large-scale kinetics of proteomes and - as a quantitative phosphoproteomics technology - directly uncovers important points in the signalling pathways that control cellular decisions.

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