Article

Going beyond “ABC” to include “GEM”: critical reflections on progress in the HIV/AIDS epidemic

HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 4.23). 02/2007; 97(1):13-8. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2005.074591
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A considerable number of studies have sought to identify what factors accounted for substantial reductions in HIV seroprevalence after several countries deployed "ABC" (abstinence, be faithful, condom use) strategies. After much public discourse and research on ABC success stories, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 2004 epidemic report indicated that nearly 50% of infected people worldwide were women, up from 35% in 1985. In light of the feminization of HIV/AIDS, we critically assess the limitations of ABC strategies. We provide 3 additional prevention strategies that focus on gender relations, economics, and migration (GEM) and can speak to the new face of the epidemic. Pressing beyond ABC, GEM strategies provide the basis for a stronger central platform from which national efforts against HIV/AIDS can proceed to reduce transmission risks.

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    • "), there is a dire need to institute universal, comprehensive HIV-prevention strategies to avert new HIV infections. But HIV-prevention efforts in southern Africa, in particular, have been less than successful (Dworkin & Erhardt, 2007). "
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    • "), there is a dire need to institute universal, comprehensive HIV-prevention strategies to avert new HIV infections. But HIV-prevention efforts in southern Africa, in particular, have been less than successful (Dworkin & Erhardt, 2007). "
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    • "The goal was to identify factors to integrate into an existing evidence-based intervention to best adapt it to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of women. Scholars and prevention advocates have indicated the need to move to comprehensive strategies to better target the challenges inherent in providing relevant HIV/STI risk reduction among women (Dworkin & Ehrhardt, 2007). Such interventions would take into consideration gender inequities, economic barriers, and issues related to migration that are not addressed in current programs. "
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