Article

Population pharmacokinetics in geriatric psychiatry.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.52). 01/2007; 14(12):993-1003. DOI: 10.1097/01.JGP.0000224330.73063.6c
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Although geriatric patients are the major recipients of drugs, most research during drug development is conducted in healthy younger adults. Safe and effective drug therapy in the elderly requires an understanding of both drug disposition and response in older individuals. One of the major issues in studying the elderly relates to the ability to study a large number of people in a minimally invasive way. Population pharmacokinetics can be used to model drug concentrations from a large population of sparsely sampled individuals. Population pharmacokinetics characterizes both the interindividual (between-subject) and intraindividual (within-subject) variability, and can identify factors that contribute to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability. Population pharmacokinetics can be used to aid in designing large clinical trials by simulating virtual data based on the study design. It can also be used to assess consistency of drug exposure and evaluate its effect on clinical outcome. This article reviews the methods used in pharmacokinetic modeling, as well as providing examples of population pharmacokinetic modeling, highlighting its application to geriatric psychiatry.

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