Article

Radiation injury and the surgeon

Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9158, USA.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons (Impact Factor: 4.45). 02/2007; 204(1):128-39. DOI: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2006.09.014
Source: PubMed
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