Article

Effects of twenty-eight days of beta-alanine and creatine monohydrate supplementation on the physical working capacity at neuromuscular fatigue threshold.

Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA.
The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (Impact Factor: 1.86). 11/2006; 20(4):928-31. DOI: 10.1519/R-19655.1
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 28 days of beta-alanine (b-Ala) and creatine monohydrate (CrM) supplementation on the onset of neuromuscular fatigue by using the physical working capacity at neuromuscular fatigue threshold (PWC(FT)) test in untrained men. Fifty-one men (mean age +/- SD = 24.5 +/- 5.3 years) volunteered to participate in this 28-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: placebo (PLA; 34 g dextrose; n = 13), CrM (5.25 g CrM plus 34 g dextrose; n = 12), b-Ala (1.6 g b-Ala plus 34 g of dextrose; n = 12), or b-Ala plus CrM (CrBA; 5.25 g CrM plus 1.6 g b-Ala plus 34 g dextrose; n = 14). The supplement was ingested 4 times per day for 6 consecutive days, then twice per day for 22 days before posttesting. Before and after the supplementation, subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle ergometry test while a surface electromyographic signal was recorded from the vastus lateralis muscle to determine PWC(FT). The adjusted mean posttest PWC(FT) values (covaried for pretest PWC(FT) values) for the b-Ala and CrBA groups were greater than those for the PLA group (p < or = 0.05). However, there were no differences between the CrM vs. PLA, CrBA vs. b-Ala, CrM vs. b-Ala, or CrM vs. CrBA groups (p > 0.05). These findings suggested that b-Ala supplementation may delay the onset of neuromuscular fatigue. Furthermore, there appeared to be no additive or unique effects of CrM vs. b-Ala alone on PWC(FT).

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