Article

Gait analysis of patients with resurfacing hip arthroplasty compared with hip osteoarthritis and standard total hip arthroplasty.

Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Center for Joint Preservation and Reconstruction, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21215, USA.
The Journal of Arthroplasty (Impact Factor: 2.11). 02/2007; 22(1):100-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.arth.2006.03.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Patients with standard total hip arthroplasties may have reduced hip abduction and extension moments when compared with normal nonosteoarthritic hips. In comparison, patients after resurfacing total hip arthroplasty appear to have a near-normal gait. The authors evaluated temporal-spatial parameters, hip kinematics, and kinetics in hip resurfacing patients compared with patients with unilateral osteoarthritic hips and unilateral standard total hip arthroplasties. Patients with resurfacing walked faster (average 1.26 m/s) and were comparable with normals. There were no significant differences in hip abductor and extensor moments of patients with resurfacing compared with patients in the standard hip arthroplasty group. This study showed more normal hip kinematics and functionality in resurfacing hip arthroplasty, which may be due to the large femoral head.

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