Article

Frequent methamphetamine use is associated with primary non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance.

AIDS Office, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, California, USA.
AIDS (Impact Factor: 6.56). 02/2007; 21(2):239-41. DOI: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e3280114a29
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We determined whether methamphetamine use is associated with the increased prevalence of primary HIV drug resistance among a cohort of men who have sex with men recently infected with HIV. In multivariate analysis, we found that frequent methamphetamine use was strongly associated with primary non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance, but not with protease inhibitor or nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance. We postulate that this association may be caused by methamphetamine-associated treatment interruptions among source partners.

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