Article

ENG mutations in MADH4/BMPR1A mutation negative patients with juvenile polyposis.

Clinical Genetics (Impact Factor: 3.65). 02/2007; 71(1):91-2. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2007.00734.x
Source: PubMed
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