Article

Trace amine-associated receptor 1 is a modulator of the dopamine transporter.

Division of Neurochemistry, New England Primate Research Center, Harvard Medical School, One Pine Hill Drive, Southborough, MA 01772, USA.
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (Impact Factor: 3.86). 05/2007; 321(1):128-36. DOI: 10.1124/jpet.106.117382
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by a broad range of monoamines and amphetamine-related psychostimulants. Recent studies demonstrated wide distribution of TAAR1 in brain, coexpression of TAAR1 with dopamine transporter (DAT) in a subset of dopamine neurons in both mouse and rhesus monkey substantia nigra, and monoamine transporter-modulated activation. This study explored whether TAAR1 could influence DAT-mediated dopamine uptake and efflux. Rhesus monkey TAAR1 expressed with DAT in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was dose-dependently activated by dopamine or (+)-methamphetamine. This activation resulted in large cAMP increases and a transient reduction in [3H]dopamine accumulation within the cells, which was similar to the effect of dopamine D1 receptor (D1) or forskolin treatment. In addition, TAAR1 effects on dopamine uptake could be blocked by a protein kinase A or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. [3H]Dopamine efflux assays performed in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium displayed a TAAR1-dependent spontaneous [3H]dopamine efflux that was dose-dependently augmented by dopamine or (+)-methamphetamine and that was blocked by either methylphenidate or a PKC inhibitor. DAT cells in Krebs-HEPES buffer had an apparent spontaneous [3H]dopamine loss, but it could not be blocked by either methylphenidate or a PKC inhibitor. Taken together, this study provides evidence that TAAR1 is involved in functional regulation of DAT and suggests that TAAR1 is a potentially important target for therapeutics for methamphetamine addiction.

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