Article

Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in the waters of Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill: 1989-2005.

Exponent, Inc., Maynard, MA 01754, United States.
Marine Pollution Bulletin (Impact Factor: 2.79). 04/2007; 54(3):339-56. DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2006.11.025
Source: PubMed
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