Article

The effects of lingual exercise in stroke patients with dysphagia.

William S Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Madison, WI 53705, USA.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Impact Factor: 2.44). 02/2007; 88(2):150-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2006.11.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine the effects of lingual exercise on swallowing recovery poststroke.
Prospective cohort intervention study, with 4- and 8-week follow-ups.
Dysphagia clinic, tertiary care center.
Ten stroke patients (n=6, acute: < or =3mo poststroke; n=4, chronic: >3mo poststroke), age 51 to 90 years (mean, 69.7y).
Subjects performed an 8-week isometric lingual exercise program by compressing an air-filled bulb between the tongue and the hard palate.
Isometric and swallowing lingual pressures, bolus flow parameters, diet, and a dysphagia-specific quality of life questionnaire were collected at baseline, week 4, and week 8. Three of the 10 subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging at each time interval to measure lingual volume.
All subjects significantly increased isometric and swallowing pressures. Airway invasion was reduced for liquids. Two subjects increased lingual volume.
The findings indicate that lingual exercise enables acute and chronic dysphagic stroke patients to increase lingual strength with associated improvements in swallowing pressures, airway protection, and lingual volume.

3 Followers
 · 
559 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The tongue plays important roles in mastication, swallowing, and speech, but its sensorimotor function might be affected by endotracheal intubation. The objective of this pilot study was to describe disturbances in the sensorimotor functions of the tongue over 14 days following oral endotracheal extubation. We examined 30 post-extubated patients who had prolonged (≥48 h) oral endotracheal intubation from six medical intensive care units. Another 36 patients were recruited and examined from dental and geriatric outpatient clinics served as a comparison group. Tongue strength was measured by the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. Sensory disturbance of the tongue was measured by evaluating light touch sensation, oral stereognosis, and two-point discrimination with standardized protocols. Measurements were taken at three time points (within 48 h, and 7 and 14 days post-extubation) for patients with oral intubation but only once for the comparison group. The results show that independent of age, gender, tobacco used, and comorbidities, tongue strength was lower and its sensory functions were more impaired in patients who had oral intubation than in the comparison group. Sensory disturbances of the tongue gradually recovered, taking 14 days to be comparable with the comparison group, while weakness of the tongue persisted. In conclusion, patients with oral endotracheal intubation had weakness and somatosensory disturbances of the tongue lasting at least 14 days from extubation but whether is caused by intubation and whether is contributed to postextubation dysphagia should be further investigated.
    Dysphagia 02/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00455-014-9594-x · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This review critiques the benefit of commonly used rehabilitative exercises for dysphagia. Common goals of rehabilitation for dysphagia and principles of neuroplasticity are introduced as they apply to swallowing and non-swallowing exercises. A critique of published studies is offered regarding their evidence for showing benefit from the exercise. One of five swallow exercises had preliminary evidence for long-term benefit and two of four non-swallow exercises have strong evidence for long-term benefit. Only a minority of exercises prescribed for patients with dysphagia have sufficient evidence for long-term improvement in swallowing.
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 03/2015; DOI:10.3109/17549507.2015.1024171 · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose:This review critiques the benefit of commonly used rehabilitative exercises for dysphagia. Method: Common goals of rehabilitation for dysphagia and principles of neuroplasticity are introduced as they apply to swal- lowing and non-swallowing exercises. A critique of published studies is offered regarding their evidence for showing benefit from the exercise. Result: One of five swallow exercises had preliminary evidence for long-term benefit and two of four non-swallow exercises have strong evidence for long-term benefit. Conclusion: Only a minority of exercises prescribed for patients with dysphagia have sufficient evidence for long-term improvement in swallowing.
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 03/2015; · 1.41 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
2,102 Downloads
Available from
May 29, 2014