Article

Progression of glaucoma associated with the Sirsasana (Headstand) yoga posture

University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas, United States
Advances in Therapy (Impact Factor: 2.44). 11/2006; 23(6):921-5. DOI: 10.1007/BF02850214
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article reports a case of progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy and visual field loss that occurred in a patient who practiced the Sirsasana (headstand) yoga posture on a daily basis for many years. Visual field analysis was performed through standard automated perimetry. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured through pneumotonometry in the sitting position and in the head-down position. Stereo-optic disc photographs were obtained. IOP increased significantly in the head-down position. Optic disc evaluation revealed a new disc hemorrhage in the left eye. Visual field analysis over a period of 2 y showed progression of a superior arcuate defect in the left eye. Transient increases in IOP associated with the yoga headstand posture may lead to progressive glaucomatous optic nerve damage and visual field loss.

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