Article

Damage Control Resuscitation: Directly Addressing the Early Coagulopathy of Trauma

USAISR, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6315, USA.
The Journal of trauma (Impact Factor: 2.96). 03/2007; 62(2):307-10. DOI: 10.1097/TA.0b013e3180324124
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Available from: John R Hess, Jul 06, 2015
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