Article

Retrograde bridging nailing of periprosthetic femoral fractures

Martini Ziekenhuis, Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
Injury (Impact Factor: 2.46). 09/2007; 38(8):958-64. DOI: 10.1016/j.injury.2006.12.011
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A retrograde femoral nail was designed to slide over the tip of the femoral stem. Eighteen patients (4 male symbol, 14 female symbol) were treated with this retrograde nail between 1995 and 2003. The mean age was 81.4 years (range 61-96) with a mean follow-up of 21 months (range 4-61 months). Eight patients suffered from severe comorbidity. Mean surgical time was 91 min. Fourteen patients regained their preoperative functional level. Six patients died within the first post-operative year of natural causes. Their knee- and hip-function were reasonable considering the age group and co-morbidity. One revision was required and one patient had a protruding nail. In all patients radiological union of the fracture was seen between 4 and 12 months after surgery. Retrograde bridging nailing of the periprosthetic fractured femur is a therapeutic option in geriatric or impaired patients and can serve as a definitive implant.

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