Article

Measurement-based care for refractory depression: a clinical decision support model for clinical research and practice.

Mood Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence (Impact Factor: 3.28). 06/2007; 88 Suppl 2:S61-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2007.01.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite years of antidepressant drug development and patient and provider education, suboptimal medication dosing and duration of exposure resulting in incomplete remission of symptoms remains the norm in the treatment of depression. Additionally, since no one treatment is effective for all patients, optimal implementation focusing on the measurement of symptoms, side effects, and function is essential to determine effective sequential treatment approaches. There is a need for a paradigm shift in how clinical decision making is incorporated into clinical practice and for a move away from the trial-and-error approach that currently determines the "next best" treatment. This paper describes how our experience with the Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial has confirmed the need for easy-to-use clinical support systems to ensure fidelity to guidelines. To further enhance guideline fidelity, we have developed an electronic decision support system that provides critical feedback and guidance at the point of patient care. We believe that a measurement-based care (MBC) approach is essential to any decision support system, allowing physicians to individualize and adapt decisions about patient care based on symptom progress, tolerability of medication, and dose optimization. We also believe that successful integration of sequential algorithms with MBC into real-world clinics will facilitate change that will endure and improve patient outcomes. Although we use major depression to illustrate our approach, the issues addressed are applicable to other chronic psychiatric conditions including comorbid depression and substance use disorder as well as other medical illnesses.

0 Followers
 · 
79 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Most patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) report clinically significant sleep problems. Pre-treatment insomnia has been associated with poorer treatment outcomes in some antidepressant trials, leading to suggestions that combined treatment regimens may be more successful in this subgroup. This study investigated this question using data from the CO-MED trial. Adult outpatients with chronic and/or recurrent MDD were randomly assigned in 1:1:1 ratio to 28 weeks of single-blind, placebo-controlled antidepressant treatment with (1) escitalopram+placebo, (2) bupropion-sustained-release+escitalopram, or (3) venlafaxine-extended-release+mirtazapine. We compared baseline characteristics, tolerability, and treatment outcomes at 12 and 28 weeks for patients with and without pre-treatment insomnia. Of the 665 evaluable patients, the majority (88.3%) reported significant pre-treatment insomnia. Those with pre-treatment insomnia were more likely to be female (69.3% vs. 57.7%) and African-American (29.1% vs. 11.8%). Those with pre-treatment insomnia symptoms reported higher rates of concurrent anxiety disorders, lower rates of alcohol and substance use disorders, and greater impairment in psychosocial functioning. The two groups did not differ in either tolerability or treatment outcomes among the three antidepressant treatments. Insomnia symptoms, while common in patients with chronic/recurrent MDD were not predictive of response, remission, or tolerability with either single or combined antidepressant medications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Affective Disorders 11/2014; 174C:157-164. DOI:10.1016/j.jad.2014.11.026 · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Anxiety and depression are common and important comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The pathophysiology of these psychological comorbidities in COPD is complex and possibly explained by common risk factors, response to symptomatology and biochemical alterations. The presence of anxiety and/or depression in COPD patients is associated with increased mortality, exacerbation rates, length of hospital stay, and decreased quality of life and functional status. There is currently no consensus on the most appropriate approach to screening for anxiety and depression in COPD. Treatment options include psychological [relaxation, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), self-management] and pharmacological interventions. Although there is some evidence to support these treatments in COPD, the data are limited and mainly comprised by small studies. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves anxiety and depression, and conversely these conditions impact rehabilitation completion rates. Additional high quality studies are urgently required to optimise screening and effective treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with COPD, to enhance complex chronic disease management for these patients.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background. Non-adherence to antidepressant treatment is not routinely measured in practical clinical trials. It has not been related to outcomes in a large sample of adults with chronic and/or recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) or any sample treated with antidepressant combinations. Methods. Adult outpatients with chronic and/or recurrent MDD were randomized to 12 weeks of treatment with bupropion-SR plus escitalopram, venlafaxine-XR plus mirtazapine, or escitalopram plus placebo. We compared non-adherence (the frequency with which daily medications were not taken) and specifically the frequency of temporarily stopping and/or skipping medication, or reducing or increasing the dose across treatments in 567 participants using a self-report questionnaire collected at each visit. We tested the association between non-adherence, and both treatment type and outcomes. Results. A non-adherence rate under 10% was reported by 77.9%, 70.9%, and 71.6% of participants during weeks 1-4, 5-12, and 1-12, respectively. Antidepressant combinations were associated with a higher non-adherence rate than monotherapy during weeks 1-4 and 1-12. During weeks 1-4, 24.1% stopped/skipped doses and 6.1% reduced the dose. During weeks 5-12, 34.7% stopped/skipped doses and 9.4% reduced the dose. Across 12 weeks, 43.2% stopped/skipped doses, and 12.9% reduced the dose. Stopping/skipping doses during all time frames and dose decreases during weeks 1-12 occurred most frequently with combination treatments. Non-adherence was unrelated to symptom remission, response, or symptom change. Conclusions. With closely monitored treatment, non-adherence is low and unrelated to depressive symptom outcome. Nonadherence is highest with antidepressant combinations. Specific non-adherent events are most often sporadic. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2014;20:118-132).
    03/2014; 20(2):118-32. DOI:10.1097/01.pra.0000445246.46424.fe

Preview

Download
0 Downloads
Available from