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Does dairy calcium intake enhance weight loss among overweight diabetic patients?

The S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 Israel.
Diabetes care (Impact Factor: 8.57). 03/2007; 30(3):485-9. DOI: 10.2337/dc06-1564
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine the effect of dairy calcium consumption on weight loss and improvement in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes indicators among overweight diabetic patients.
This was an ancillary study of a 6-month randomized clinical trial assessing the effect of three isocaloric diets in type 2 diabetic patients: 1) mixed glycemic index carbohydrate diet, 2) low-glycemic index diet, and 3) modified Mediterranean diet. Low-fat dairy product consumption varied within and across the groups by personal choice. Dietary intake, weight, CVD risk factors, and diabetes indexes were measured at baseline and at 6 months.
A total of 259 diabetic patients were recruited with an average BMI >31 kg/m2 and mean age of 55 years. No difference was found at baseline between the intervention groups in CVD risk factors, diabetes indicators, macronutrient intake, and nutrient intake from dairy products. Dairy calcium intake was associated with percentage of weight loss. Among the high tertile of dairy calcium intake, the odds ratio for weight loss of >8% was 2.4, P = 0.04, compared with the first tertile, after controlling for nondairy calcium intake, diet type, and the change in energy intake from baseline. No association was noted between dairy calcium and other health indexes except for triglyceride levels.
A diet rich in dairy calcium intake enhances weight reduction in type 2 diabetic patients. Such a diet could be tried in diabetic patients, especially those with difficulty adhering to other weight reduction diets.

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    • "Initial studies by Zemel et al. (2000) [76] reported that those patients in the highest quartile of adiposity were negatively associated with calcium and dairy product intake. Another nutritional intervention trial also demonstrated that higher low-fat dairy intake among overweight type 2 diabetic patients on isocaloric-restricted regimens enhances the weight loss process [77]. Furthermore observational studies have presented inverse associations between dairy intake and the prevalence of insulin resistance syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus [78] [79]. "
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    • "Among the high tertile of dairy calcium intake, the odds ratio for weight loss of >8% was 2.4, p Z 0.04, compared with the first tertile, after controlling for non-dairy calcium intake, diet type, and the change in energy intake from baseline. They concluded that a diet rich in dairy calcium intake enhances weight reduction in type 2 diabetic patients [11]. "
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