Article

Homozygous silencing of T-box transcription factor EOMES leads to microcephaly with polymicrogyria and corpus callosum agenesis

Institut National d'Hygiène du Maroc, Rabat, Rabat-Salé-Zemmour-Zaër, Morocco
Nature Genetics (Impact Factor: 29.65). 05/2007; 39(4):454-6. DOI: 10.1038/ng1993
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Neural progenitor proliferation and migration influence brain size during neurogenesis. We report an autosomal recessive microcephaly syndrome cosegregating with a homozygous balanced translocation between chromosomes 3p and 10q, and we show that a position effect at the breakpoint on chromosome 3 silences the eomesodermin transcript (EOMES), also known as T-box-brain2 (TBR2). Together with the expression pattern of EOMES in the developing human brain, our data suggest that EOMES is involved in neuronal division and/or migration. Thus, mutations in genes encoding not only mitotic and apoptotic proteins but also transcription factors may be responsible for malformative microcephaly syndromes.

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