Article

Coffee and cardiovascular disease: in vitro, cellular, animal, and human studies.

Department of Chemistry, Loyola Hall, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA 18510, USA.
Pharmacological Research (Impact Factor: 3.98). 04/2007; 55(3):187-98. DOI: 10.1016/j.phrs.2007.01.006
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage with potential health benefits. This review will focus on cardiovascular disease. There are three preparations of coffee that are commonly consumed and thus worthy of examination; boiled unfiltered coffee, filtered coffee, and decaffeinated coffee. Coffee has over a thousand chemicals, many formed during the roasting process. From a physiological point of view, the potential bioactives are caffeine, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol found in the oil, and the polyphenols, most notably chlorogenic acid. We will examine coffee and its bioactives and their connection with and effect on the risk factors which are associated with heart disease such as lipids, blood pressure, inflammation, endothelial function, metabolic syndrome and potentially protective in vivo antioxidant activity. These will be critically examined by means of in vitro studies, cell experiments, animal supplementation, epidemiology, and the most definitive evidence, human trials.

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