Article

Oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment can be separated from lipofuscin accumulation in aged human skeletal muscle.

Department for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
Aging Cell (Impact Factor: 5.71). 05/2007; 6(2):245-56. DOI: 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2007.00282.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT According to the free radical theory of aging, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as a driving force of the aging process, and it is generally believed that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major source of increased oxidative stress in tissues with high content of mitochondria, such as muscle or brain. However, recent experiments in mouse models of premature aging have questioned the role of mitochondrial ROS production in premature aging. To address the role of mitochondrial impairment and ROS production for aging in human muscles, we have analyzed mitochondrial properties in muscle fibres isolated from the vastus lateralis of young and elderly donors. Mitochondrial respiratory functions were addressed by high-resolution respirometry, and ROS production was analyzed by in situ staining with the redox-sensitive dye dihydroethidium. We found that aged human skeletal muscles contain fully functional mitochondria and that the level of ROS production is higher in young compared to aged muscle. Accordingly, we could not find any increase in oxidative modification of proteins in muscle from elderly donors. However, the accumulation of lipofuscin was identified as a robust marker of human muscle aging. The data support a model, where ROS-induced molecular damage is continuously removed, preventing the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria despite ongoing ROS production.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
56 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evidence exists for locomotor muscle impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including fiber type alterations and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity. In this study high-resolution respirometry was used to quantify oxygen flux in permeabilized fibres from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle in patients with COPD and compared to healthy control subjects. The main findings of this study were that (i) routine state 2 respiration was higher in COPD; (ii) state 3 respiration in the presence of ADP was similar in both groups with substrate supply of electrons to complex I (COPD 38·28 ± 3·58 versus control 42·85 ± 3·10 pmol s(-1) mg tissue(-1) ), but O(2) flux with addition of succinate was lower in COPD patients (COPD 63·72 ± 6·33 versus control 95·73 ± 6·53 pmol s(-1) mg tissue(-1) ); (iii) excess capacity of cytochrome c oxidase in COPD patients was only ~50% that of control subjects. These results indicate that quadriceps muscle mitochondrial function is altered in patients with COPD. The regulatory mechanisms underlying these functional abnormalities remain to be uncovered.
    Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging 03/2011; 31(2):124-31. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Caloric restriction (CR) mitigates many detrimental effects of aging and prolongs life span. CR has been suggested to increase mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby attenuating age-related declines in mitochondrial function, a concept that is challenged by recent studies. Here we show that lifelong CR in mice prevents age-related loss of mitochondrial oxidative capacity and efficiency, measured in isolated mitochondria and permeabilized muscle fibers. We find that these beneficial effects of CR occur without increasing mitochondrial abundance. Whole-genome expression profiling and large-scale proteomic surveys revealed expression patterns inconsistent with increased mitochondrial biogenesis, which is further supported by lower mitochondrial protein synthesis with CR. We find that CR decreases oxidant emission, increases antioxidant scavenging, and minimizes oxidative damage to DNA and protein. These results demonstrate that CR preserves mitochondrial function by protecting the integrity and function of existing cellular components rather than by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis.
    Cell metabolism 12/2012; 16(6):777-88. · 17.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A decline in mitochondrial function plays a key role in the aging process and increases the incidence of age-related disorders. A deeper understanding of the intricate nature of mitochondrial dynamics, which is described as the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission, has revealed that functional and structural alterations in mitochondrial morphology are important factors in several key pathologies associated with aging. Indeed, a recent wave of studies has demonstrated the pleiotropic role of fusion and fission proteins in numerous cellular processes, including mitochondrial metabolism, redox signaling, the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA and cell death. Additionally, mitochondrial fusion and fission, together with autophagy, have been proposed to form a quality-maintenance mechanism that facilitates the removal of damaged mitochondria from the cell, a process that is particularly important to forestall aging. Thus, dysfunctional regulation of mitochondrial dynamics might be one of the intrinsic causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, which contributes to oxidative stress and cell death during the aging process. In this Commentary, we discuss recent studies that have converged at a consensus regarding the involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in key cellular processes, and introduce a possible link between abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and aging.
    Journal of Cell Science 08/2010; 123(Pt 15):2533-42. · 5.88 Impact Factor

Full-text

View
0 Downloads