Article

Sustained induction of NF-kappa B is required for efficient expression of latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology, University of California San Francisco, 1650 Owens Street, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
Journal of Virology (Impact Factor: 4.65). 07/2007; 81(11):6043-56. DOI: 10.1128/JVI.02074-06
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cells harboring infectious, but transcriptionally latent, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviruses currently pose an insurmountable barrier to viral eradication in infected patients. To better understand the molecular basis for HIV-1 latency, we used the J-Lat model of postintegration HIV-1 latency to assess the kinetic relationship between the induction of NF-kappaB and the activation of latent HIV-1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an oscillating pattern of RelA recruitment to the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) during continuous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulation. RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment to the HIV-1 LTR closely mirrored RelA binding. Transient stimulation of cells with TNF-alpha for 15 min induced only a single round of RelA and RNA Pol II binding and failed to induce robust expression of latent HIV-1. Efficient formation of elongated HIV-1 transcripts required sustained induction by NF-kappaB, which promoted de novo synthesis of Tat. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and serine-2-phosphorylated RNA Pol II were rapidly recruited to the HIV-1 LTR after NF-kappaB induction; however, these elongating polymerase complexes were progressively dephosphorylated in the absence of Tat. Okadaic acid promoted sustained serine-2 phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of RNA Pol II and stimulated efficient transcriptional elongation and HIV-1 expression in the absence of Tat. These findings underscore important differences between NF-kappaB and Tat stimulation of RNA Pol II elongation. While NF-kappaB binding to the HIV-1 LTR induces serial waves of efficient RNA Pol II initiation, elongation is impaired by the action of an okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase that dephosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA Pol II. Conversely, the action of this phosphatase is overcome in the presence of Tat, promoting very efficient RNA Pol II elongation.

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