Article

Frequent napping is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, pain, and nocturia in older adults: Findings from the National Sleep Foundation '2003 Sleep in America' Poll

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.52). 05/2007; 15(4):344-50. DOI: 10.1097/01.JGP.0000249385.50101.67
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of regular napping among older adults.
The National Sleep Foundation's "2003 Sleep in America Poll," a 20-minute telephone interview that focused on the topic of "sleep and aging" (N = 1,506 adults 55-84 years of age).
Overall, 15% of respondents reported regular napping, ranging in prevalence from 10% among those 55-64 years of age to 25% among those 75-84 years of age. In addition to older age and a strong association with excessive daytime sleepiness, other factors that independently increased prevalence included a diagnosis of depression, bodily pain, and nocturia.
Regular napping is common among older adults. Longitudinal studies of napping behavior and health status are needed to establish risk factors other than excessive daytime sleepiness.

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