Article

Membrane-grafted hyaluronan films: a well-defined model system of glycoconjugate cell coats.

Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany.
Journal of the American Chemical Society (Impact Factor: 10.68). 06/2007; 129(17):5306-7. DOI: 10.1021/ja068768s
Source: PubMed
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